This blog is dedicated to the men and women of Combat Search and Rescue. I take NO credit for ANY posts made here unless explicitly specified. If you see a piece of media that is yours please send me a message and I will give you credit where it is due. Enjoy!
Reblogged from soldierporn  143 notes

soldierporn:

Tight squeeze.

[1] U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Ryan Darnell (right), 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron team leader, and his teammates move a mock patient through an opening during a mission rehearsal in an excess structure at Bagram Air Field.

[2,3] U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Ryan Darnell, 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron pararescue team leader, monitors mock patient, Airman 1st Class Benjamin Martin, while the team prepares to extract him from the structure through a hole in the floor.

[4] U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Thomas Schalin hands Senior Airman Joseph Brady a backpack after pulling mock patient, Airman 1st Class Benjamin Martin, from a building during a mission rehearsal.

[5] U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jason Lee pulls himself out of a crawlspace as Senior Airman Joseph Brady secures equipment.

The mission rehearsal event allowed pararescuemen from the 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron to hone their breaching, clearing, patient care and egress skills. Air Force rescue forces conduct combat search and rescue and personnel recovery operations. The 83rd ERQS partnered with Joint Task Force Trailblazer, U.S. Army 2nd Engineer Brigade, to use the structure prior to its scheduled deconstruction. Task Force Trailblazer is currently demolishing 50-70 wooden structures here each week as part of Operation Enduring Freedom retrograde operations.

(US Air Force photos by Major Brandon Lingle, 26 AUG 2014.)

Reblogged from green-berret  330 notes
green-berret:

Air Force pararescuemen ride in the back of a medevac helicopter with the bodies of two U.S. soldiers killed in a roadside bomb attack in Kandahar Province, October 10, 2010. Photographer Guttenfelder describes the scene: “When the pararescue guys were covering the bodies, they only had two flags with them. The wind was shipping through the open window…and the wind caught it and it blew out the window and they lost it. So they only had one flag. (But) one of the pilots had a flag that he kept behind the plate of his flak jacket, one that he’d kept with him for every deployment he’d ever done: Iraq, Afghanistan. He flew over Washington DC with it, his children had kissed it. He took it out and passed it to the back of the helicopter and that was one of the flags they used to cover one of the guys. The family of the soldier who died, who was covered by the donated flag, has reached out to me to ask for a contact for the pilot. They are hoping to give the flag back to him.”

green-berret:

Air Force pararescuemen ride in the back of a medevac helicopter with the bodies of two U.S. soldiers killed in a roadside bomb attack in Kandahar Province, October 10, 2010. Photographer Guttenfelder describes the scene: “When the pararescue guys were covering the bodies, they only had two flags with them. The wind was shipping through the open window…and the wind caught it and it blew out the window and they lost it. So they only had one flag. (But) one of the pilots had a flag that he kept behind the plate of his flak jacket, one that he’d kept with him for every deployment he’d ever done: Iraq, Afghanistan. He flew over Washington DC with it, his children had kissed it. He took it out and passed it to the back of the helicopter and that was one of the flags they used to cover one of the guys. The family of the soldier who died, who was covered by the donated flag, has reached out to me to ask for a contact for the pilot. They are hoping to give the flag back to him.”

Reblogged from tactical-trunkmonkey  344 notes

Pararescuemen, also known as PJs (Pararescue Jumpers), are United States Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) and Air Combat Command (ACC) operatives tasked with recovery and medical treatment of personnel in humanitarian and combat environments. These special operations units are also used to support NASA missions and have been used to recover astronauts after water landings. They are attached to other SOF teams from all branches to conduct other operations as appropriate. Of the 22 enlisted Air Force Cross recipients, 12 are Pararescuemen. They wear the maroon beret as a symbol of their elite status, and to symbolize the blood shed by past PJs, as well as the blood current PJs are willing to shed to save lives.

Pararescuemen, also known as PJs (Pararescue Jumpers), are United States Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) and Air Combat Command (ACC) operatives tasked with recovery and medical treatment of personnel in humanitarian and combat environments. These special operations units are also used to support NASA missions and have been used to recover astronauts after water landings. They are attached to other SOF teams from all branches to conduct other operations as appropriate. Of the 22 enlisted Air Force Cross recipients, 12 are Pararescuemen. They wear the maroon beret as a symbol of their elite status, and to symbolize the blood shed by past PJs, as well as the blood current PJs are willing to shed to save lives.

Reblogged from opafginger  3 notes

tacticalteenager:

Ordered the Stew Smith PJ workout plan book. I read through the ten week plan and saw it is supposed to end on test day. And for some reason I felt a great fear. To me, the next two years are dedicated to crushing my fear of that day…