This blog is dedicated to the men and women of Combat Search and Rescue. I take NO credit for ANY posts made here unless explicitly specified. If you see a piece of media that is yours please send me a message and I will give you credit where it is due. Enjoy!
Reblogged from green-berret  311 notes
green-berret:

Air Force pararescuemen ride in the back of a medevac helicopter with the bodies of two U.S. soldiers killed in a roadside bomb attack in Kandahar Province, October 10, 2010. Photographer Guttenfelder describes the scene: “When the pararescue guys were covering the bodies, they only had two flags with them. The wind was shipping through the open window…and the wind caught it and it blew out the window and they lost it. So they only had one flag. (But) one of the pilots had a flag that he kept behind the plate of his flak jacket, one that he’d kept with him for every deployment he’d ever done: Iraq, Afghanistan. He flew over Washington DC with it, his children had kissed it. He took it out and passed it to the back of the helicopter and that was one of the flags they used to cover one of the guys. The family of the soldier who died, who was covered by the donated flag, has reached out to me to ask for a contact for the pilot. They are hoping to give the flag back to him.”

green-berret:

Air Force pararescuemen ride in the back of a medevac helicopter with the bodies of two U.S. soldiers killed in a roadside bomb attack in Kandahar Province, October 10, 2010. Photographer Guttenfelder describes the scene: “When the pararescue guys were covering the bodies, they only had two flags with them. The wind was shipping through the open window…and the wind caught it and it blew out the window and they lost it. So they only had one flag. (But) one of the pilots had a flag that he kept behind the plate of his flak jacket, one that he’d kept with him for every deployment he’d ever done: Iraq, Afghanistan. He flew over Washington DC with it, his children had kissed it. He took it out and passed it to the back of the helicopter and that was one of the flags they used to cover one of the guys. The family of the soldier who died, who was covered by the donated flag, has reached out to me to ask for a contact for the pilot. They are hoping to give the flag back to him.”

Reblogged from tactical-trunkmonkey  331 notes

Pararescuemen, also known as PJs (Pararescue Jumpers), are United States Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) and Air Combat Command (ACC) operatives tasked with recovery and medical treatment of personnel in humanitarian and combat environments. These special operations units are also used to support NASA missions and have been used to recover astronauts after water landings. They are attached to other SOF teams from all branches to conduct other operations as appropriate. Of the 22 enlisted Air Force Cross recipients, 12 are Pararescuemen. They wear the maroon beret as a symbol of their elite status, and to symbolize the blood shed by past PJs, as well as the blood current PJs are willing to shed to save lives.

Pararescuemen, also known as PJs (Pararescue Jumpers), are United States Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) and Air Combat Command (ACC) operatives tasked with recovery and medical treatment of personnel in humanitarian and combat environments. These special operations units are also used to support NASA missions and have been used to recover astronauts after water landings. They are attached to other SOF teams from all branches to conduct other operations as appropriate. Of the 22 enlisted Air Force Cross recipients, 12 are Pararescuemen. They wear the maroon beret as a symbol of their elite status, and to symbolize the blood shed by past PJs, as well as the blood current PJs are willing to shed to save lives.

Reblogged from tacticalteenager  11 notes

tacticalteenager:

yafsocs:

This is by far, in my opinion, the greatest way to show off what’s going to come of this blog. Especially when I enlist next year, I’ll be sure to send out my stuff. Today I have a video of Pararescuemen from the 131st Rescue Squadron, Moffett Federal Airfield, Calif. preparing to hoist down from an HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter to a merchant vessel in order to retrieve an injured commercial sailor, Nov. 29, 2012. Pararescuemen airlifted the sailor to a hospital in San Diego, California. 

My brother is the Aerial Gunner in this clip.